Red Burgundies North and South

Burgundy MapOn Sunday, we tasted two reds from the upper and lower parts of Burgundy. The 1999 Domaine Lucien Boillot & Fils Les Champonnets 1er Cru Gevery-Chambertin was exceptional. Generously offered from Deborah’s father’s cellar for a lunchtime paring of roast pork and vegetables, it was just starting to show its age with a slight brick hue at the meniscus. It also had a slightly dull haze which was most likely due to not being filtered as it had no faults. Intensely aromatic, with all the classic traits of an excellent Gevery-Chambertain -- firm, full and dark -- this one was also intensely fruity with beautifully integrated fall leaves, smoky notes, mushroom and a light cheesiness; a complete knockout and easy to see why Gevery-Chambertain was Napoleon’s favorite wine. With a difficult act to follow, the 2000 Moulin-à-Vent des Hospices had a difficult time drumming up any sort of excitement. Only a year younger than the Gevery, it was noticeably more youthful, deep purple-red, and noticeably much less aromatic. As Moulin-à-Vent is normally the most age worthy of Beaujolais, this one may have entered a dumb period and might have benefited from 5 to 10 years more underground. Still, it had fine notes of red currant, black cherries, white pepper and brown sugar and was soft, round and medium-full bodied. It was a serious wine and certainly didn’t have any of the banana candy flavors often associated with Gamay.

2 Comments

Steve De Long
Steve De Long

June 16, 2014

The big reason that wasn’t clear in the note is that the Beaujolais was tasted 4 hours later (sorry) If they were to be consumed simultaneously, I would have reversed the order without thinking. Yes, the most powerful Gamay is no match for a good Pinot Noir! Also, I believe the banana character isn’t from carbonic maceration as many say but from yeast 71B as noted in http://www.louisdressner.com/Brun/ Thanks for the hospices link — perhaps ours was over the hill?

Eric LECOURS
Eric LECOURS

June 16, 2014

Interesting that you chose to have the Beaujolais after the Gevrey. Any reason? In retrospect, would it have been better to have reversed the order? I imagine the Beaujolais didn’t exhibit the banana character because is was vinified traditionally rather than by carbonic maceration, probably in a fashion more similar to the Gevrey than a non-Cru Beaujolais.

http://www.collinbourisset.com/englishv/moulin_hospices.htm

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