DE LONG BLOG

Should Grape Varieties Be Capitalized?

Is it Cabernet Sauvignon or cabernet sauvignon?

The New York Times and Slate.com don’t capitalize the names of grape varieties but practically everyone else does. What, then, is the correct usage?

This may seem a little geeky or pedantic but it’s important for anyone who writes about wine. I seem to revisit this question every couple of years without satisfaction.

View full article →

Wine Map of Bordeaux

Here's a wine map of Bordeaux that that shows the general style and level of detail that goes into all of our maps. It's a detail from our Wine Map of France and is suitable for framing.

View full article →

Vintages Matter

In 2007 Hugh Johnson said that vintages don't matter anymore and I pretty much agreed.  His statement was more of a rebuke to the wine trade and its use of snobbery and insecurity of consumers to inflate prices.  This has been especially true of top Bordeaux wines but after a string of difficult years, there has been less emphasis on using vintage as a marketing tool.

View full article →

Current and Upcoming Wine Maps

Using our wine map tube labels, here are our plans for continued mapping of the wine world

We would love your input.

View full article →

Desert Island Wines

Desert Island Sixes are a mixed half case of the wines that you would want if stranded on a desert island. They may not be the greatest you've ever tasted but ones that you won't tire of (you may be on that island for a while!). Vintages are not given - these are wines that are enjoyed even in bad years.

View full article →

The Making of the South American Wine Map

Wine Map of South America

This map was almost as difficult to produce as our Wine Map of Italy. There weren’t bribes to paid to shady men in funny hats or anything like that but four different countries with different rules and agencies made it much harder than imagined.

Chile is well documented and straight-forward as you might expect in a exporting powerhouse. Brazil and Uruguay are also fairly straight-forward but some digging through their wine laws was essential to provide more detail. Argentina was just confounding. The Wines of Argentina publishes maps that are somewhat accurate but also somewhat vague, mislabeled, with some regions in the wrong place and some using non-standard names. For example, Uco Valley center isn’t a region – it’s actually called Tunuyán. This is just one of many. When I asked them about this, they were very friendly and a little defensive. Hopefully they’ll revamp their maps in the future. Especially since the internet easily facilitates the bobbling head repetition of errors and misinformation.

Wine Map of South America